Natural Cures: Secrets “They” Don’t Want You to Know About – A Book Review

I am an avid reader, especially if it can positively impact your life. Kevin Trudeau is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of Natural Cures “They” Don’t Want You to Know About that he self-published in 2004. I read the updated 2014 version. It was very informative; I was very impressed with his personal story. Some concepts were new to me, and others I have put into practice as it relates to food.

The book includes natural cures for over 50 diseases and ailments. If you decide to read the book, don’t just read that chapter. Trudeau gives plenty of background information to help you having an understanding of the “real” truth. For instance, he discusses healthcare in America, the reasons people get sick, weight loss, and the reasons that people are overweight.

Whatever the case, you have to take charge of your own health. About 3 or 4 years ago, I started researching the quality of food and healthcare.  There are a lot of great resources in this book, but you’re not expected to follow everything. Eliminating one bad habit and replacing it with a smart one can make a big difference in your health.  The things that seem so simple and make sense are the most difficult to do. (I talk to people about eating green vegetables and they look at me strangely). I don’t get offended. I do it for MY HEALTH.   If you want to lose weight, feel better, and be healthy, your lifestyle needs to change.

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The Transition Back to Work

 

 

I know that it’s been a while since I’ve posted a blog. After almost a year and a half of being a stay-at-home mom, I decided to go back to work. Since my son is in school for 5 hours a day 5 days per week, I figured it would be a great time to return to the lab. I have a Master of Science degree in Analytical Chemistry, so my experience is primarily in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. I must say that so far, it has been an interesting experience.   Every day is unpredictable. You don’t know what projects may come up. Of course, everything has a tight deadline, but most places that I’ve worked revolve around them.

My commute is reasonable and typical…about 45 minutes to an hour when you factor in traffic. My co-workers are friendly, although many of them are very stressed. There are times that you are required to stay past 5:00 pm or work on the weekends. Whatever the case, I refuse to be stressed out. Things are starting to turn around for the better. Oh, the power of prayer! The company recently treated us to lunch from Panera Bread, one of my favorite places. Three or four days out of the week, I leave on time. If you plan your workday properly and organize your time, you don’t need to work late. However, as I mentioned before, this job can be very unpredictable at times; things will just pop up out of nowhere.

One thing that I’ve learned this past week is not to second-guess myself. When you’re given wrong information, it affects your results. Fortunately for me, for my current project, I double-checked the method, and my results were ALWAYS correct. Just think if I had not brought it to their attention and repeated that entire experiment? It would have been in vain and a waste of time! I know that I’ve been out of the lab for a while, but I always try to produce high-quality work.

Do I regret going back to work? Not at all! I’m home to read to my son every night, and I see him before I leave in the mornings. I truly believe that this job is preparation for the next opportunity. (This position is a short-term contract, and the company will be relocating to Tennessee.) Also, I love having extra money. I like to pamper myself and buy necessities for the house. As wives, I’m sure that we all love getting facials, manicures, and pedicures. Maybe even a different hairstyle will sometimes make a difference.

Regardless of my next work project, I am prepared for anything that may happen. The key for my success will be organization, trusting my instincts, and attention to detail. Not only do you need to check your own results and data, but you also need to check to make sure that you are receiving accurate information from others working on the same project.